Tag Archives: Industries

splatter cinema presents rosemary’s baby & advertising products for non-profits

splatter-cinema-logoLast night I had the pleasure of viewing Rosemary’s Baby at the Plaza Theater here in Atlanta. I had never before seen Roman Polanski’s 1968 horror classic, and Splatter Cinema sufficiently hyped the movie beforehand with “authentic recreations of some of the most graphic scenes of the film” right in the theater lobby. Anybody know where I can find the picture of me posed with a bloody babydoll next to a cloaked man wielding a knife? Thanks.

The lobby also held a table of branded t-shirts, coozies, and handmade horrific handbags. This kind of branded merch and other advertising products for non-profits have a dual effect: both spreading awareness about the brand and raising money to support the organization.

Keep reading.

Using Promo Products to Target Hispanic American Consumers

Photo courtesy of http://shop.pepsiusa.com/.

“Yo Sumo.” The Spanish phrase, which in English translates to “I count,” forms the basis of PepsiCo’s current campaign addressing Hispanic Americans. The campaign hopes to spur Hispanic consumers not only to participate in the 2010 Census, but to make their citizenship “count” to the fullest extent. Instead of just filling out the form and being included in the census tally, “Yo Sumo” urges them to discuss their experiences and influence on the American nation via Pepsi’s interactive website, http://www.pepsiyosumo.com. Popular Hispanic actress Eva Longoria Parker is slated to collaborate with Pepsi to film a documentary based on anecdotes posted to the site. The “Yo Sumo” website has already caught on within America’s Hispanic community, and many fans of the initiative have purchased official “Yo Sumo” custom t-shirts (pictured above). Lots of “Yo Sumo” supporters proudly wear their logo apparel in profile pictures on social networking sites to communicate their excitement to friends and family!

As was the case with the last national census in 2000, experts expect Hispanic consumers to comprise a large portion of respondents, reminding marketers about their immense purchasing power. If you compete in an industry that targets largely Spanish-speaking market segments, there are lots of promotional products that you can customize in order to reach out to these consumers. You can, and should, take immediate action to diversify your marketing mix to appeal to Hispanic audiences. Consider ordering items like these calendars featuring Spanish text or imprinted pens that sound a cheery Spanish voice recording to end users when their heads are pressed down. In addition to items with predetermined stock messages in Spanish, don’t forget that you can tailor any promotional products to people of any native language by specifying your own custom content and graphics.

Dana
Team Lead – Social Media
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Promotional Products on Mars

Breaking news: Pinnacle Promotions has become the first promotional products distributor to receive an order for promotional products to be featured at a trade show on Mars. The event is scheduled to occur on July 8, 2010 and will host companies from a range of industries including cable providers, plumbers, and electricians.

APRIL FOOLS!!

Did I trick you? Well, if you are anywhere near as gullible as I am, April Fools Day is the one day a year where other, more cynical people can relate to our predicament. One April Fools Day when I was in the sixth grade, a close friend informed me in the morning that her father had decided to accept a job in Alaska and she was moving at the end of the week. Of course, I had forgotten that it was April Fools Day and fell for her blatant lie hook, line, and sinker. She strung me along for about an hour before she took pity on me and came clean about her story. Read more about April Fools Day in the Corporate World

Where Have You Spotted John Deere Promotional Products?

redjarHaving been born and bred in Georgia, I am no stranger to the distinctive green and yellow logo featured on John Deere promotional products. Okay, so I grew up in the metro Atlanta area, where farmland is sparse and suburban residents have no need for heavy duty John Deere agricultural equipment to manicure their manageable front yards… Nevertheless, I had peers who would not leave home without their trademark John Deere trucker hats. I always knew that the brand had a longstanding, loyal following in the Southeast, but during my teen years, I viewed it as more of a trend- wearing John Deere paraphernalia made people my age appear “rugged” and “outdoorsy”. Looking back, I wonder if even half of the John Deere-clad teenagers I knew had ever stood within 3 feet of an actual tractor!

An article on BrandFreak.com discusses John Deere’s current campaign, called “What Will You Create.” It features actual customers who have accomplished amazing agricultural feats using John Deere equipment. For example, take Larry Carlson, a New Yorker who transformed a 5 acre potato field into a Tuscan-inspired panorama of gardens and mazes using tractors made by- you guessed it- John Deere. Keep reading…

Toyota, Tylenol, and How One “Bachelor” Contestant Could Use Promotional Products in Her Everyday Life

vvvracerOn Monday night’s episode of “The Bachelor: The Women Tell All,”* Southern Belle and single mother Ella commented on the behavior of fellow bachelorette (and also the instigator of much of this season’s drama), Vienna, by saying:

“She would do and say things she would not think about before she did them. She may be sorry for them later, but then if you continue that after ‘I’m sorrys,’ it’s not going to fly.”

At the time, I paused and pondered Ella’s statement. Although perhaps not the most eloquently put version of a value that I have been taught from a young age, her honesty and simple interpretation of why Vienna lost her credibility were refreshing. “I’m sorry” can be a powerful phrase, but overusing it may cause the listener to become skeptical of the apologetic individual or party’s sincerity.

A recent BrandWeek article about Millward Brown’s list of “most trusted and recommended brands” brought to light a shining example of the impact of apologies in the corporate world. The list is based on the survey responses of over 20,000 U.S. consumers at the end of 2009. Tylenol, ranked 6th on the list, happens to have had numerous recalls over the years, including one in 2009, the year in which the data for this study was collected. Eileen Campbell, global CEO of Millward Brown, explained the company’s high ranking by saying, “Doing well in a crisis actually builds trust.”

Toyota, number 7 on the list, only began facing scrutiny in early 2010 regarding the safety of their vehicles, so I am curious to see how the established car manufacturer’s trust rating will fare among consumers in the future. Personally, I think Toyota’s crisis recovery efforts have been outstanding, and by admitting their lapses in quality assurance and promising to improve, they have already begun to regain the respect of many consumers. Think about how you react after you make a mistake: I know that I am overly cautious because of fear of repeating the same error. I guess only time will tell if Toyota will exhibit the same staying power as Tylenol.

As for Vienna, I think her actions have alienated the vast majority of Bachelor viewers, but hey, she still has a chance to get the guy! Maybe he will be more receptive to her apologies than Ella and the rest of her former housemates; if all else fails, she could try imprinting the words “I’m sorry” on promotional products as tokens of her on-going remorse instead of just saying them time and again. :)

* As many of my coworkers know, I tune into a variety of reality shows, from “Say Yes to the Dress,” to “The Real Housewives of ____” (you could fill in practically any city name/season and chances are I have seen the majority of the episodes), to, I’m almost ashamed to admit, “The Bachelor.” Although not the most mentally stimulating, hopefully this blog has proven reality tv’s capacity to teach valuable life lessons to unassuming viewers like myself.

Dana
Team Lead – Social Media
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Chance Encounters Due to Fate? Or to Promotional Business Card Magnets?

luisar-/busy-streetDuring a trip to New York City this weekend, I learned that Jaime could not be more right about the value of the traditional promotional business card magnet. I was in the Big Apple visiting my college roommate, Amanda, and on my first night in town we ran into a group of girls that we were friends with in school but with whom we had since lost touch completely. Now, Manhattan holds the title of the largest city in the United States (based on population) and if I had to guess, I’d say the city is home to the most bars and restaurants too. With such an assortment of options, what are the odds of randomly encountering old friends at a restaurant? The chances are a lot smaller than one would think, when taking the company’s effective use of promotional products into account.

Consider this scenario: Amanda was excited for my visit and, since our love of food has always been something over which we bond, she was looking for a fun, new restaurant to try. She narrowed down the various locales (she picked the slightly edgy Meatpacking District), but still seemed overwhelmed by the number of choices. After reading restaurant reviews online and coming up empty-handed, she needed a break and walked into the kitchen for a refreshing glass of water. And it was there, on the freezer, that she discovered the answer. Amanda’s roommate had enjoyed the fine fare of a French restaurant in Meatpacking District the previous month and had subsequently brought home the restaurant’s promotional business card magnet. As a personal recommendation from another foodie speaks highly about a restaurant, we decided to try to the French café.

The cuisine was delightful and so was the atmosphere, especially because we spotted our former friends as soon we walked into the quaint little restaurant. After the hugging and giggling subsided, I asked them how they picked the place. Their reply: “a business card magnet, of course!”

Sarah
Marketing Coordinator
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How to Increase Online Sales: Promotional Products for Web-Savvy Seniors

Dave Dugdale-wheelmouseWhile jean leggings, Swedish nail beds, and other fads of 2009 have mostly come and gone with the passing year, some shopping trends are here to stay. In 2009 more seniors were shopping online than ever before, and experts predict this will be an ongoing trend. The new senior market offers many advertising opportunities, making it important to stay educated about how to effectively reach this group.

Seniors- defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as those aged 65 or older- are the fastest growing segment in the United States and moreover the group with the largest disposable income and ability to make purchase decisions (unlike teens who also have large disposable incomes but often have their spending controlled or limited by parents). In fact, seniors spend over $7 billion online according to research by SeniorMag.

So, how do companies target the influential senior demographic? One important detail to recognize when marketing to seniors is that older men and women often have more time to research products and are less likely to buy on impulse. That being said, seniors are increasingly turning to the Internet in order to compare items and they often make their purchases online too.

In order to appeal to this developing demographic, companies that focus heavily on e-commerce need to ensure that their sites are user-friendly. Marketers can do this by posting pictures of seniors using their products and writing promotional material that contains relevant and interesting information, as seniors are often skeptical of ads that sound too “sale-sy.” Since seniors are more likely to trust companies that they view as honest and practical, distributing promotional products is another effective way to garner attention and loyalty from the senior audience because it allows them to sample functional products while reinforcing a brand name.

Although seniors are often savvier shoppers than teens and baby boomers who shop online, they are typically interested in the same types of products as younger audiences. Top purchases made by seniors include travel tickets and hotel arrangements, MP3 players and other electronics, and apparel. And, Americans over the age of 65 are some of the most loyal you can find, evidenced by an AARP survey showing that more than 80% of seniors who shopped online were satisfied with their purchases. Just don’t try to sell them the latest heavy metal CD!

Sarah
Marketing Coordinator
view my bio!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/36144637@N00/ / CC BY-SA 2.0

http://www.flickr.com/photos/moondstuldio/ / CC BY 2.0

A Promotional Products Bill of Rights

http://www.youtube.com/user/SchoolHouseRockKids#p/c/BEF70B25331D09DE/4/2TBxxPPhzj8

As a United States citizen and more specifically, an avid blog writer, the right to freedom of speech is very important to me. That’s why I wanted to take the time to honor the fact that today is Bill of Right’s Day. The United States Bill of Rights, otherwise known as the first ten Constitutional amendments made to protect citizens’ privileges and interests, first came into effect 218 years ago on December 15, 1791. Since then, other laws have been created to protect citizens and various customer behaviors, including the Consumer Bill of Rights that was created by President John F. Kennedy, Jr. in 1962.

After much frustration over faulty products and little manufacturer liability, President Kennedy decided that consumers had the prerogative to protect themselves from defective products, false or exaggerated advertising and generally unethical corporate practices and procedures. This sentiment has evolved over the years and, with the ability to shop online and compare prices, is more important than ever these days.

As a consumer in the promotional products industry, you have right to be safe, the right to choose your products and distributors freely, the right to have your product requests be heard and the right to be educated about new items on the market. You also have the right to be informed about production schedules and all costs, rules and regulations that may apply to your purchases. One common regulation was discussed in Jaime Weinstein’s blog about Prop 65. Although it only relates to products distributed in California, Prop 65, along with an entire Consumer Product Safety Commission, was created as part of many consumer rights’ acts.

Your right to staying well informed is one part of the broader guarantee to high-quality service from professional account teams. So the next time you shop for promotional products, make sure you use your rights wisely by choosing a company that fits all of these needs and guarantees your consumer rights!

Sarah
Creative Writing Intern
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Shopping Online for Promotional Products? Try PPAI Award Nominated Pinnacle Promotions.

awardslogo_webnominee_smPinnacle Promotions has been selected as a nominee for not one, but TWO 2010 PPAI Web Awards. These prestigious awards are given to distributor and supplier members of the promotional products industry based on demonstrated excellence in five distinctive categories. We have been nominated for the categories of “Functionality/Usability” and “Visual Design/Creativity.”

To me, both of these nominations speak to Pinnacle’s role as an innovator. A recent blog post by Rosabeth Moss Kanter discusses why “steady progress – step by single step – can win internal support and the external race for share of market or share of mind.” She discusses several characteristics of innovations most likely to effectively garner support, and the attribute that struck me as most closely aligned with Pinnacle’s accomplishments is tangibility. In her explanation of what “tangible” innovations entail, she states that:

“It offers concrete results that can be seen to make a difference in something that users need and value.”

What do our users need? What do they value? We think that an intuitive website and enjoyable shopping experience are ultimately two of the most sought-after ideals of buyers when choosing a promotional products distributor. So what broad areas constitute these two components? Why, “Functionality/Usability” and “Visual Design/Creativity,” of course. From the addition of Quick Links and Themes on our homepage to provide ideas for customers who are “just browsing,” to the recent reorganization of the navigation bar at the top of our site to make it easier to peruse our most popular categories, every change we make happens for a reason: our customers. In every facet of our website, we strive to create personal connections with our visitors. Even now, I can tell you that our team is hard at work improving our website and thinking of new ways to enhance the overall experience delivered by a visit to our site. After fourteen years of “step by single step” innovation, it seems fitting that Pinnacle Promotions has been nominated for recognition within our industry. We are humbled by this great honor and whether we win or lose in January, we look forward to retaining our status as an innovator for many years to come!

Dana
Team Lead – Social Media
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Pink Gloves Dance: Can You Spot the Promotional Products?

Providence St. Vincent Medical Center in Portland, Oregon sure knows how to get down and dance! They are the makers of this very popular YouTube video – Pink Gloves Dance.

It all started with a glove manufacturer, Medline Industries, which decided to make pink hospital gloves instead of green. For each case sold in the month of October, Medline donated $1 to breast cancer research.

St. Vincent decided that the more health care workers wear pink gloves, the more people would talk about breast cancer. More than 200 hospital staff volunteered to wear the pink gloves in a video. There are lab technicians, janitorial staff, kitchen staff, nurses and doctors all showing their moves dancing in the hospital.

There are lots of different promotional products available to help support various causes, and a few ideas are featured on the Pinnacle Promotions Promotional Marketing Calendar.

We even have a specific page dedicated to Breast Cancer Awareness Month which provides several product ideas and marketing recommendations.

Can you spot the following promotional products in the video?

1) Flag
2) Scrubs
3) Lanyard
4) Doctor Jacket
5) Hawaiian Lei
6) Pink Umbrella

One of my favorite and most effective promotional products is the pink umbrella. While it’s raining as you walk through the town, your awareness message can be seen from so many people. I encouraged the use of a fold up umbrella to one of my non-profits last year for their campaign. They received such positive feedback that they decided to use umbrellas again this year!!

Eliza
Account Manager
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